1940s LASFS GALLERY

This gallery is a companion piece to my (currently forthcoming) ebook 'BIXELSTRASSE - The SF Fan Community of 1940s Los Angeles', and shows LASFS members, visitors, and others who feature in that text. It has been assembled from the contemporary photos I have been able to locate so their quality varies quite a bit and there a couple of notable people missing. It is hoped to gradually improve the gallery as/when more or better photos become available. At present I'm particularly looking for decent contemporary headshots of Nieson Himmel, Alva Rogers, and Jimmy Kepner.

Some of the people pictured are more strongly associated with other cities and fan groups, but for a period during the 1940s they were LASFS members, hence their inclusion.

MEMBERS

Forry ACKERMAN

Abby Lu ASHLEY

Al ASHLEY

Barbara BOVARD

Ray BRADBURY

Mark BLANCK

Beverly BRONSON

Phil BRONSON

Mel BROWN

Ed CHAMBERLAIN

Arthur Jean COX

Bill CRAWFORD

J.CUNNINGHAM

Walter DAUGHERTY

Morrie DOLLENS

E. Everett EVANS

Mike FERN

Dot FINN (HASSE)

Peg FINN (CRAWF.)

Paul FREEHAFER

Lou GOLDSTONE

Henry HASSE

Gerald HEWETT

Nieson HIMMEL

Russ HODGKINS

Bob HOFFMAN

Charles D. HORNIG

Arthur JOQUEL II

Jimmy KEPNER

Eph KOENIGSBERG

Francis T. LANEY

Virginia LANEY

Earl LEETH

Walt LIEBSCHER

Len MOFFATT

MOROJO

Eleanor O'BRIEN

Elmer PERDUE

POGO

Jack RHODES

Alva ROGERS

Milton ROTHMAN

Sam RUSSELL

Art SAHA

TIGRINA

A.E. van VOGT

J. WEIDENBECK

Gus WILLMORTH

T. Bruce YERKE
VISITORS

Alden ACKERMAN

Cleve CARTMILL

Jonne EVANS

Will GOULD

Edmond HAMILTON

Clare Winger HARRIS

L. Ron HUBBARD

Henry KUTTNER

C.L. MOORE

Jack PARSONS

Ross ROCKLYNNE

Jack SPEER

Frank ROBINSON

Bob TUCKER

Bryce WALTON

M-Beth WHEELER

Art WIDNER
OTHERS (who appear in the ebook)

Allen CLASS

Erle KORSHAK

Fritz LEIBER

The first link below is to a fascinating tour by car through Bunker Hill and Downtown in 1940s Los Angeles, which shows the city as it was known to fans of the time. The video gives some idea of what Bixel Street's rooming houses would have looked like, but the closest it appears to get to Bixel Street itself is Angels Flight which, like Pershing Square, was less than a mile from the clubroom. The second link is a side-by-side with the first footage showing the same drive insofar as it's possible today. (Thanks to redevelopment the topography of the former Bunker Hill isn't the same as it was back then.)

Google street view will show you what the section of Bixel Street where the Bixelstrasse was looks like now, but almost nothing from the 1940s still exists. There's no place for dwellings like that on such now valuable Downtown real estate and they've all been replaced by office buildings and expensive-looking condos..

COMING SOON:

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